The Unremembered Life

When one comes to the close of their life’s work the question is often raised, “How do you want to be remembered?”   What legacy, if any, do we want to have?  This question is not only asked in the realm of business but in ministry as well.  Let me ask a more fundamental question–should we want to be remembered?  And if so, why?  Outside of our families and our churches, why should we expect anyone to call our deeds to mind?    The fact of the matter is that the vast majority of those whose lives and deeds will be remembered before God have passed through this world with little to no notice.  These men lived and labored and died in obscurity.  No one outside of their churches listened to their sermons or read their writings.  The word (secular and sacred) built them no monuments.  Many have been laid to rest without even a headstone to mark the brevity of their lives.    A pastor friend of mine recently wrote these words to me, “If you want to be great in God’s kingdom, learn to be a servant and shut up, be content with faithfulness and relative obscurity, stay the course, fight the good fight, find out what God says for pastors to do then do it till you can’t, then die and enjoy glory.”

Sounds good to me.

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One response to “The Unremembered Life

  • Bob

    It is native in man to crave his remembrance after his departure. He fancies that he “will live on in their memories” and this glory he borrows for the present to find significance to his existence.

    So I said in my heart, “As it happens to the fool, It also happens to me, And why was I then more wise?” Then I said in my heart, “This also is vanity.” 16 For there is no more remembrance of the wise than of the fool forever, Since all that now is will be forgotten in the days to come. And how does a wise man die? As the fool! 17 Therefore I hated life because the work that was done under the sun was distressing to me, for all is vanity and grasping for the wind. (Ecc 2:15 NKJ)

    God, in mercy, raises but a few godly men to historical prominence that we may learn by their example what marvelous use He makes of clay.

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